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Labor Beethoven 2020: Virtual Festival

The Akademie der Künste hereby presents the complete programme for the "Labor Beethoven 2020" festival, now in the form of an online virtual festival and virtual exhibition. Produced behind closed doors, the programme includes more than ten world premieres, one sound installation (Werner Cee), a music theatre production (Novoflot) and the "Labor 1802-2020" exhibition focusing on experimentation.

The festival, originally scheduled for mid-March, was intended to present the musical and interdisciplinary results of the four-year artistic collaboration by young composers from Basel, Tel Aviv and Thessaloniki to a broad audience. Due to the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing lockdown, the concerts could not be performed before a live audiences but were filmed instead.

The newly created works can now be enjoyed as individual films in all their musical variety and in the spirit of experimentation. There is much to discover on the digital platform: the previously unknown experimental world of Beethoven contemporary Anton Reicha, Marcus Schmickler's take on Mauricio Kagel's Ludwig van, Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony as a sound collage by Werner Cee, the 'freedom opera' Fidelio as deconstructed by Novoflot and the multifaceted acoustic experiments of the young generation of composers from Tel Aviv, Basel and Thessaloniki.

In the "Labor 1802-2020" virtual exhibition, scholarly and artistic material from both Beethoven’s time and the present day has been intertwined with numerous autographs, audio files, texts, photos and videos.

Download Program (PDF)

From the laboratory

A group of young composers met over the course of four years to participate in intensive work phases including workshops, discussions, concerts and rehearsals. The "Labor Beethoven" project offered time and space for ideas and concepts to [...]

A group of young composers met over the course of four years to participate in intensive work phases including workshops, discussions, concerts and rehearsals. The "Labor Beethoven" project offered time and space for ideas and concepts to develop freely – inspired by the engagement with the age of Beethoven and with current questions regarding space, instrumentation and form. The result is a unique body of works comprising new compositions in which the participating composers from Basel, Tel Aviv and Thessaloniki under the direction of Caspar Johannes Walter, Dimitri Papageorgiou and Ruben Seroussi were able to pursue their individual research interests. These première performances were composed for Ensemble Adapter and selected soloists.

Project "Labor Beethoven"

Thanos Sakellaridis: Dystopia
for Ensemble
2020, UA

For Thanos Sakellaridis, music is not just a matter of bourgeois high culture; in many of his projects from Labor Beethoven he set it in the context of popular cultures of our time. That also includes science fiction. Regarding his work Dystopia (2020) for ensemble, he writes that it is “an imaginary diary of Jacky 3.2, a sex robot prostitute from the future. Jacky sold her consciousness to a cult-like religion from the 1960s. She was promised eternal life, infinite possibilities and an unknown future. A few days after this transaction, she was stabbed in a dark, damp alley near a river... Jacky 2.0, the first model of a clone of this Jacky, awoke on 14 September 2095. In this dystopian future society, she was tied up, providing pleasures of the flesh, in a world of eternally restless flesh. She couldn’t even escape through death. When one clone’s time was up, the next was already waiting. Who would want to live forever like that? The piece is the third part of a trilogy, the first two parts of which have not yet been written and probably never will be.“

Noa Mick, Saxophone
Chris Moy, Electric guitar
Mathias Engler, Percussion
Uli Fussenegger, Double Bass
Adrian Nagel: Stilleben [Akkordeon I]
for Accordion and Electronics
2019, UA

Through reduction, Adrian Nagel recognises the potential for sculptural sound-time creations in the interior of largely static material. Stillleben [Akkordeon I] for accordion and electronics uses “sound material that brings with it a strong formal power, so that no further intervention is needed for the process of finding a musical form. The Stillleben [Akkordeon I – III] series was based on an existing form. The bellows of the accordion fill up with air when drawn apart and empty out when squeezed together. In addition to the resulting sound, the visual of the opening and closing has a special aesthetic quality. When working with the accordionist, I keep focusing on the same thing in my search for the extreme, namely the question as to how long such a period (initial and final state: closed bellows) could be drawn out for?
I then set her the task of finding the tone that could make the longest possible sound using soft but stable dynamics. The result exceeded my expectation by far: Instead of the two to three minutes I had estimated, the sound lasted almost eleven minutes. In my piece, this result becomes an event.“

Julius Schepansky, Accordion
Faidra Chafta Douka: Stones
for Double Bass
rev. 2020

Für Faidra Chafta Douka ist der Kontakt zu den Interpreten entscheidend. Ihr Stück Stones für Solo-Kontrabass ist in besonderem Maße auf Uli Fusseneggers Virtuosität zugeschnitten. Dieser Kontrabass ist kein tiefes und schwerfälliges Instrument, er umfasst alle Register und seine Beweglichkeit ist die einer Geige.

Uli Fussenegger, Double Bass
Batya Frenklakh / Guy Rauscher: Entanglement
for Ensemble Adapter
2020, UA

Ausdrücklich erwünscht war im Labor Beethoven Eigeninitiative, die bis in die Strukturen hineinreichen konnte. Eine der ersten Fragen von Guy Rauscher war, ob er Batya Frenklakh, eine Kollegin aus Tel Aviv, als Ko-Komponistin in das Labor mit einbringen könnte. Seit 2018 entstanden so eine Reihe von Kompositionen, bei denen das bürgerliche Dogma des Schöpfers eines Werkes nicht mehr zutraf, die aber trotzdem alles andere als pluralistisch waren. Es scheint, dass sich hier zwei im Kern sehr verschiedene Persönlichkeiten auf gute Weise ergänzen. Beide schreiben über ihre inzwischen vierte Zusammenarbeit entangled particles, dass „die zwei Sätze, obwohl jeweils in eigener Raum-Zeit Region und jeweils eine eigene Identität zeigend, doch auf intime Weise seltsam und in Wegen jenseits der Vorstellbarkeit miteinander verbunden sind.“

Ensemble Adapter:
Kristjana Helgadóttir, Recorder
Ingólfur Vilhjálmsson, Clarinet
Gunnhildur Einarsdóttir, Harp
Matthias Engler, Percussion
Ari Rabenu: Trio
for Violin, Trombone and Harp
2016 – 2020, UA
  1. Völkerwanderung
  2. Zeitgefühl
  3. Entwertung
  4. Das ausgewachsene Haustier
  5. Wöchentlich bin ich ...

Ari Rabenu made the opportunity of “long-term cooperation with the artists“ within the framework of Labor Beethoven the core of his multi-movement work Trio (2016 – 2020). Following partial presentations in workshop concerts, the piece will now be premiered in full. He describes his ongoing collaboration with the musicians from zone expérimentale as follows: “I derived my ideas and inspiration for the next movements from the shared experience with the artists every time. My way of composing changed. Because of the constant new experiences of working together, the artistic invention stretched out over a long period of time, growing in parallel to my development as a composer and as a person.“ The influence of external impressions on his inner personality becomes the core of the work in a reflected manner: “If I had to define the common ground of the various movements of the work, I would say that they are all to do with time. More specifically, they deal with how irreversible time changes our inner and outer worlds and how we seem to perceive them. In the movements, fast linear processes are presented and persistently driven forward, never returning to the starting point. This serves to express the randomness with which time influences our existence.“

Zoé Pouri, Violin
Francisco Olmedo, Trombone
Alice Belugou, Harp
Manolis Ekmektsoglou: Circus story: Taming the Animals
for Percussion, Saxophones and Electronics
2020, UA

Manolis Ekmektsoglou has always seen the momentum of his music and the communication with the audience as an expression of joy. About his piece Circus story: Taming the animals, he writes: “It’s normal to assume that a drummer can tame animals easier than a saxophonist. Is this also the case here? Are they trying to tame the animals in a chaotic circus here or perhaps their own chaotic souls?“

Matthias Engler, Percussion
Noa Mick, Saxophone
Faidra Chafta Douka: while bent
for two Paetzold Flutes, Trombone, Harp and two Violas
2020, UA

The pieces for instrumental duos by the Greek composer Faidra Chafta Douka are sculptural constellations in time and space, unfolding in the calm atmosphere of the exhibition hall.

“[…] Till finally you hear how words are coming to an end.
With every inane word a little near to the last.
And how the fable too.
The fable of one with you in the dark.
The fable of one fabling of one with you in the dark.
And how better in the end labour lost and silence.
And you as you always were.
Alone.”
(aus: Company von Samuel Beckett)

Max Volbers, Paetzold Flute
Elisabeth Wirth, Paetzold Flute
Francisco Olmedo, Trombone
Alice Belugou, Harp
Karen Lorenz, Viola
Nikolaus Schlierf, Viola
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
for Ensemble Adapter und Piano
2020, UA

NYJA by Anda Kryeziu is based on a plurality of impressions. A large ensemble is further enhanced by live electronics with sensor control and 8-channel spatialisation. Here, the concert format is far exceeded. Open forms and installative concepts mix with performative elements.

Ensemble Adapter:
Kristjana Helgadóttir, Recorder
Ingólfur Vilhjálmsson, Clarinet
Gunnhildur Einarsdóttir, Harp
Matthias Engler, Percussion

Guests:
Chris Moy, Electric Guitar
Uli Fussenegger, Double Bass
Anda Kryeziu, Piano
Eleni Ralli: 4 Small Pieces at One Tone
for two Saxophones
2014, DEA

Eleni Ralli rewrote her 4 Small Pieces at One Tone for a saxophone duo. The fully composed iridescence of the single tone is at the centre: the individual sound unfolds in a variety of sound options, so that a dialogue emerges between the two instruments in search of a balance between accent and synchronisation.

Noa Mick, Saxophone
Don-Paul Kahl, Saxophone
Adrian Nagel: Stillleben [Kontrabass]
for Double Bass and Electronics
2020, UA

In Adrian Nagel’s Stillleben [Kontrabass] for double bass and electronics, the sounds are isolated from one another and each considered individually. Sound blocks consisting of flageolet sounds of the live double bass are contrasted with recorded double bass sounds. The perception changes over the course of the piece: first, the events are perceived for themselves, then an awareness emerges of the little differences, which finally comes together to form the overall impression of an image, the „Stillleben” (Still Life). As in many other works by the composer, the theme of perception itself is examined.

Uli Fussenegger, Double Bass
Manolis Ekmektsoglou: In Love ...
for Ensemble Adapter und Soprano
2020, UA

In Love … is an intimate piece by Manolis Ekmektsoglou: “Yes, it’s what you think ... maybe cheesy, maybe dreamy, this work encompasses all of my feelings and emotional outbursts from the last time I was in love ... When was the last time I heard someone say they were in love? I have no idea ...”

Sara Gouzi, Soprano

Ensemble Adapter:
Kristjana Helgadóttir, Recorder
Ingólfur Vilhjálmsson, Clarinet
Gunnhildur Einarsdóttir, Harp
Matthias Engler, Percussion
Thanos Sakellaridis: Please Enter the Underground
for a duo of two Paetzold Recorders
2019

Here, an instrument whose role in the world of music is still developing takes centre stage: the paetzold recorder. This instrument has only been around for a few decades and uses a square rather than a round tube. This new creation initially motivated by reasons of cost-efficiency allows the discovery of many new sounds. Thanos Sakellaridis‘ work achieves „rhythmic and gestural patterns that are slowly subjected to a process of constant repetition, returning to their initial state again at the end“.

Max Volbers, Paetzold Recorder
Elisabeth Wirth, Paetzold Recorder

Beethoven, Reicha & CO

When Beethoven was active, around 1800, departures were being made in many areas, not just music. In some scientific disciplines, namely physics and mathematics, the foundations were being laid for a new understanding [...]

When Beethoven was active, around 1800, departures were being made in many areas, not just music. In some scientific disciplines, namely physics and mathematics, the foundations were being laid for a new understanding of the world beyond the tangible, a process that was to be completed by Einstein. These visionaries clearly went beyond the imaginable. The search for clues led us to some interesting works for cello by Beethoven and Anton Reicha (which can be explored as cello with fortepiano recordings) and to the analysis of experimental aspects of Beethoven's Diabelli Variations and the Tempest Sonata, Anton Reicha's visionary Practische Beispiele as well as experiments by Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni and Hermann von Helmholtz (explored in the "Labor 1802-2020" virtual exhibition).

Ausstellung "Labor 1802-2020"

Ludwig van Beethoven: Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen
Variations for Violoncello and Fortepiano WoO 46

In 1801, Beethoven wrote his seven Variations for Cello and Piano, Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen (WoO 46), on a theme taken from Mozart‘s The Magic Flute. This rather delicate and simple work, composed in 1801, is in the immediate temporal context of the creation of some of Beethoven’s greatest works, such as The Tempest Sonata Op 31 / 2, composed in 1801 / 1802.

Santiago Bernal Montaña, Violoncello
Rosalia Gómez Lasheras, Fortepiano
Ludwig van Beethoven: Deux Grand Sonates pour le Clavecin ou Piano-Forté avec un Violoncelle obligé
(Œuvre 5, Sonata 1)

In 1796, Ludwig van Beethoven wrote his first Cello Sonata in F Major Op. 5/1 and G Minor Op 5/2. The common title he chose for them was Deux Grand Sonates pour Le Clavecin ou Piano-Forte avec un Violoncelle obligé. This refers to the special relationship between the two instruments: the piano was no longer the centre point as it was for Mozart; here the cello was an equal partner. The composition followed the encounter with Jean Louis Duport, one of the greatest cello virtuosos of his time. Both the cello part and the piano part are appropriately demanding. Imagine one of the solo piano parts from the first two piano concertos being joined by a virtuoso cello. But in this work imbued with youthful strength and freshness, virtuosity is certainly not everything – Beethoven was already experimenting with form here. It only has two movements of large-scale dimensions (the first movement lasts a total of approx. 17 minutes), with the first allegro preceded by a broad, slow introduction that anticipates his late style. Here, the flow of time defies metric classification from the very first moment.

Santiago Bernal Montaña, Violoncello
Rosalia Gómez Lasheras, Fortepiano
Ludwig van Beethoven: Sonate für Klavier und Violoncello, op. 102,1
1. Movement: Andante teneramente, Allegro vivace

Beethoven‘s late sonata, a brooding, tonally rich work of unique formal conception, spans an arc to the early sonata performed the previous day. Like that sonata, it has two movements. However, each of the allegro movements is preceded by a slow introduction. While the first allegro begins with a clearly defined cut, the final allegro develops associatively from the preceding introduction, as if the musical concept was just emerging in the process of trying and pausing – a wonderful moment of freedom and detachment from any formal norms.

David Eggert, Violoncello
Gili Loftus, Fortepiano
Anton Reicha: 3 Fugues from: Trente six Fugues pour le Piano-Forté composes d‘après un nouveau systême
(op. 36)

„Der Geist, eingeschränckt durch wenige Mittel, sucht Auswege (und findet sie) auf welche er vielleicht nie verfallen wäre; und so erreicht er seinen Zweck. ... dass uns manches beim ersten Anblick unmöglich scheint, dem wir endlich doch durch anhaltendes Forschen Realität geben können. …“

These two comments are found in Anton Reicha’s series of texts on the Practische Beispiele, philosophical-theoretical notes dating from 1799 – 1802, which refer to specific compositions. They could be a motto for Reicha’s laboratory, his research-oriented dialogue between music and utopian thought. Reicha developed musical visions that were only redeemed centuries later: atonality, complex metrics and much more. The fact that Reicha and Beethoven knew each other well allows for a refreshing new look at Beethoven.

Establishment for Cello und Fortepiano: David Eggert

David Eggert, Violoncello
Gili Loftus, Fortepiano

Guest projects

Beethoven's music has always served as an inspiration and starting point for contemporary appropriations and artistic commentaries. For the festival, Werner Cee realised [...]

Beethoven's music has always served as an inspiration and starting point for contemporary appropriations and artistic commentaries. For the festival, Werner Cee realised his "de-symphonic" project on the Pastoral Symphony as a sound installation with light in the beech garden at the Akademie der Künste. The NOVOFLOT opera company staged Fidelio as a freedom opera in a music theatre installation (performances before physically present audiences are planned for autumn 2020), and Marcus Schmickler updated Mauricio Kagel's film Ludwig van, which provides a critical perspective on the anniversary.

Further deconstructions by Pierre Henry (Dixième Sinfonie) and Peter Ablinger (Weiss/Weisslich 22) form part of the "Labor 1802-2020" exhibition.

Werner Cee: de-symphonic
Novoflot: Fidelio
Ausstellung "Labor 1802-2020"

Music Theatre Installation: Wir sind so frei #1 Fidelio
by Novoflot and L. v. Beethoven

The premiere will take place on December 17, 2020, at Akademie der Künste.

Fidelio is the first part of the trilogy Wir sind so frei #1 – #3 dedicated by Novoflot to Beethoven and his anniversary, which was created between opera and piano concert, music theatre exhibition and symphony, philharmonic space exploration and newly composed music. A wide range of instrumental ensembles, singers and performers logically consider Ludwig van Beethoven‘s idiosyncratic compositional practice for the future and explore it scenically in extreme spatial dispositions. Beethoven‘s curiosity about contradiction serves as a crucial driving force here! Wir sind so frei #1 – #3 is a consideration of 250 years of the most powerful impacts of a singular musical body of works on contemporary art. In the first part of the new trilogy, Novoflot make Beethoven‘s Fidelio sound like the echo of a freedom opera. In an exhibition performance for trumpet, sound installation, keys and vocals, in the midst of a stelae field of acoustic sources and artefacts, the achievements of the French Revolution appear as long-forgotten attributes. The trumpet signal, once the healing musical message of a supposed happy ending serves as the foundation stone for an experimental arrangement for trumpeter Damir Bacikin, who examines the utopian potential of opera, as well as Beethoven‘s musical dramaturgy determination process in the White Cube with an ensemble of performers. In the process, the voices of the protagonists of the opera call out from the beyond, which composer and pianist Antonis Anissegos transforms into a kaleidoscope of sound, original music and new compositions.

Sven Holm (director), Vicente Larrañaga (musical director), Antonis Anissegos (composition / sound installation), Elisa Limberg (stage), Anne Storandt (stage assistance), Silvie Naunheim (costumes), Mirko Borscht (video), Rafal Dziemidok (choreography), Sven Holm & Malte Ubenauf (concept) Ismael Schott (light design & technical direction), Koray Alkan (sound design), Dörte Wolter, Miriam Glöckler & Thorsten Cölle (production)

with Antonis Anissegos, Damir Bacikin, Maxime Barbasetti, Konstantin Bez, Almut Kühne, Vicente Larrañaga and Renae Shadler

Voices from beyond / sound installation: Rebecca von Lipinski (Leonore), Narine Yeghiyan (Marzelline), Florian Hoffmann (Jaquino), Antony Shelley (Rocco)

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
Marcus Schmickler: Ludwig van, Kraftwerk – Eine Kritische Diskothek
Lecture-Performance with Video und Elektronics
2020

Ludwig van, Kraftwerk – eine kritische Diskothek is an experimental lecture on Kagel‘s view of how Beethoven was received around 1970 and Schmickler’s perspective on it now. The central point of reference is Kagel‘s film Ludwig Van, which he realised in 1970 on the occasion of L. v. Beethoven‘s 200th birthday on behalf of WDR. “Is Beethoven‘s music ever misused?“ asks Werner Höfer, following the format of the political talk show Der Internationale Frühschoppen in the film. In his experimental film, Kagel addresses plural positions between the artefacts of the experience society and the relevant achievements of the avant-garde of the 20th century. The post-modern “disposition or state of mind” discussed in the film does not follow any obsessions with unity but rather revels in an irreducible conflict between the many languages, mindsets and ways of living. In the year of the film première, Kagel invited the band Kraftwerk, which had only been formed six months previously, to his “Musiksalon“ in Aachen. The band played a concert there referencing Ludwig van Beethoven‘s 15th String Quartet Op.132. The “Musiksalon“ was Kagel’s installation at the Neue Galerie in Aachen, founded by Irene and Peter Ludwig. In May 2020, Kraftwerk, who have become music icons themselves, will play their only concert in Germany to mark their 50th anniversary at BTHVN2020, an international Beethoven festival initiated by the City of Bonn involving hundreds of events. Every 250 years: Can Beethoven‘s music still be saved?

Werner Cee: de-symphonic
A Symphonic Soundscape. Kontra Punkt Berlin
2019/2020

An interior view of the “Pastoral”: Sound artist Werner Cee breaks open the symphonic and temporal structure of Beethoven‘s 6th Symphony. The symphony recorded in fragments with Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin is transformed into a walk-in, multi-perspectival sound topography. As in a technical exploded view, images and parts from Beethoven‘s “Pastoral” are accentuated and individual instruments and groups of instruments are isolated. Perspectives shift, a symphonic soundscape between romantic orchestral sounds, field recordings and object-like plasticity unfolds.
Two installations are created from this material: a smaller one at the Akademie der Künste and an expansive one in the Ruhr area. The venue for the second installation is the former Duisburg-Meiderich smelting works and blast furnace. What is now Landscape Park Duisburg-Nord is one of the most popular natural and cultural landscapes in North Rhine-Westphalia, surrounded by giants of the industrial age.
The installation at the Akademie der Künste in Berlin is the exposition presenting the thematic material.

Werner Cee (concept and composer), Wolfgang van Ackeren (production)
with Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Vladimir Jurowski and Ralf Sochaczewsky (conductors) Johanna Vollus and Peter Avar (sound)

A production of Deutschlandfunk Kultur, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin and Hans-Flesch-Gesellschaft as part of BTHVN2020 in cooperation with the Akademie der Künste.
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Werner Cee: de-symphonic. Kontra Punkt Berlin (2019 / 2020)
A Symphonic Soundscape

Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Labor 1802 – 2020
Ausstellung

Andrea Heilrath: Chladni’sche Klangfiguren
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Andrea Heilrath: Das Interferometer-Instrument
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anton Reichas Experimentallabor
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Andrea Heilrath: Helmholtz’sche Lochsirene
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Eva Gentner / Adrian Nagel: III (Wooden Boxes)
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Aus dem Labor: ungewöhnliche Instrumentationen und Konstellationen
Eröffnungskonzert

Thanos Sakellaridis: Dystopia
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Thanos Sakellaridis: Dystopia
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Thanos Sakellaridis: Dystopia
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Adrian Nagel: Stillleben [Akkordeon I]
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Faidra Chafta Douka: Stones
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Batya Frenklakh / Guy Rauscher: Entanglement
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Batya Frenklakh / Guy Rauscher: Entanglement
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Batya Frenklakh / Guy Rauscher: Entanglement
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Ari Rabenu: Trio
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Ari Rabenu: Trio
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Ari Rabenu: Trio
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Manolis Ekmektsoglou: Circus story: Taming the animals
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Beethoven und Sakellaridis
Kammermusik

Thanos Sakellaridis: Please Enter the Underground
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Ludwig van Beethoven: Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Aus dem Labor: Der offene Raum
Konzert

Manolis Ekmektsoglou: In Love ...
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Anda Kryeziu: NYJA
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Caspar Johannes Walter
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Eleni Ralli: 4 Small Pieces at One Tone
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Adrian Nagel: Stillleben [Kontrabass]
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert

Wir sind so frei #1 Fidelio
Ausstellungsperformance von Novoflot und L. v. Beethoven

Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert
Foto: mutesouvenir-kb, © Kai Bienert